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Four Tips that Can Help You Ace your Phone Interview

October 14th, 2019

Phone interviews and initial phone screenings are not new; they’ve long been used by employers to narrow down a large pool of candidates without the hassled and expense of bringing everyone into the office for an in-person session. Phone interviews usually give both parties a chance to establish a few basic parameters and deal-breakers before either party decides to invest further, a process that cut a large pile of resume in half within hours instead of days.

But there is one aspect of the phone interview process that’s on the rise in the modern workforce: Remote hiring, which may mean that the phone is your only mode of communication, not just your first. In 2019, your employers may hire you based on this medium alone, without ever seeing or talking to you in person.

So here’s how to use the phone (and only the phone!) to show off your readiness for the role.

Check your connections and distractions.

Before the call takes place, check and double-check to make sure your barking dog is locked in another room, your noisy children are in someone else’s care, your phone is fully charged, your signal is strong, and you have everything you need within reach. A quiet room and a strong connection can help you get your message across. If you’re currently employed while taking the call, arrange an hour at home or a coffee shop; try not to scuttle into a stairwell or whisper into the phone from your cubicle while you’re at work.

Do as much research as you can.

It’s always a good idea to research the company and the job before an interview, but this is especially important when the interview happens by phone. Why? Because over the phone, you have limited ways to show off. It’s harder to steer the conversation in your direction when you can’t use visual cues, and you can’t wow your interviewer with your million-dollar smile. So use what you have! A few signs of effort can go a long way.

Speak more slowly and clearly than you normally do.

You may think it’s best to adopt a natural and relaxed demeanor and be yourself. But over the phone, the stakes are higher if you deliver a garbled sentence or tell an incomplete story. If your witty remarks fall flat because your interviewers didn’t understand you, the fallout can be unfortunate. Slow down. Enunciate. And use fewer words to make your point than you would in person.

Reveal yourself through your voice.

Smile when you greet your caller; the person can hear your smile. Before you answer any question, pause for two full seconds. Convey your energy and interest through your voice. Again, you have limited ways to do this, so make the most of all of them!

For more on how to crush your interview, contact the staffing team at Merritt!

How to Sell Yourself During a Phone Interview

November 23rd, 2018

When your employers contact you by phone for an initial screening or a formal interview, you’ll want to be ready. Phone interviews and in-person interviews are very different, and while in some ways the phone may be an easier tool for candidates, it also precludes some helpful forms of non-verbal communication like body language and facial expressions. Here are a few things to keep in mind before you get ready to wow an employer with your voice alone.

Smiling and nice clothes still have an impact.

Your employer can’t see your face, but certain expressions show through in our voices, and a smile is one of them. When you’re smiling, your listeners can hear it. So, as you say hello and greet the person, make sure you’re wearing an appropriate expression—even if there’s no one in the room with you. As for professional clothing, what you wear can subtly influence your presentation and sense of self. There’s no need to dress to the nines but keep this unconscious connection in mind as you prepare for your call.

Avoid friendly interruptions.

A few well-intended interruptions may be fine and may even come off as a sign of high enthusiasm. But don’t let them become a pattern. In real life, your interruption says, “I’m excited by what you’re saying, and I don’t need to hear all of it before I chime in”, but over the phone, this isn’t clear. Let your employer finish speaking and then pause for a full second before you respond.

Complete every sentence and laugh audibly.

Don’t say anything—a statement, a joke, an assertion, or an agreeable remark—unless you are prepared to turn your words into a complete sentence or thought. Don’t stop short or trail off. Trail-offs have a place in face-to-face conversation, but with a stranger over the phone, they can be confusing. As for laughter, when your interviewer makes a lighthearted remark, turn your quiet smile or shy chuckle into an audible laugh, or a “ha ha”. Otherwise it’s just a weird silence.

Let your interviewer drive.

Let the conversation go wherever your interviewer wants to take it and let them control the pace. When two people vie for the driver’s seat in a face-to-face dialogue, the result can be engaging, sparkling and often meaningful and memorable. But over the phone, signals can easily get crossed and confused. One driver is enough. If you’d like to redirect, do so clearly and assertively.

Turn up your wattage.

Are you interested in the job? Are you excited to share your relevant experience and qualifications? Do you have questions about the role? Great! Take this energy and play to the back row. Dial everything up by one notch so it’s easier for your listener to pick up on your vibe.

For more on how to ace your interview—on the phone or in person—turn to the career management experts at Merritt.

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