Stratford Office: 203-386-8800 | Stamford Office: 203-325-3799

Can a Recruiter Find me a Job?

March 17th, 2017

As you search for work, you lean heavily on a few tested and proven resources. For example, you’re contacting every member of your network who might be able to help you. And chances are, you’re combing the internet each day searching for job posts in your field and in your geographic area. You have a resume posted online and you’re making the most of your informational interviews and meetings with your mentors. But what about recruiters? Should you call a recruiting agency and ask for some help? Should you answer those mysterious messages from recruiters that sometimes show up in your inbox? Can a recruiter help you land a job? Here’s our answer.

Reaching out directly.

If you pick up the phone and contact a staffing agency you’ll be asked a few questions about what you’re looking for, and you may be asked to stop by the office for a personal meeting. The ways in which we can help you will depend on your needs, and the wider your flexibility, the better. If you’re willing to accept a temporary position, we can assign you on a contract basis to employers who need temporary or seasonal help. If you’re looking for a full-time role in a specific field, we can help with that too.

Answering messages from recruiters.

Recruiters don’t always reach out directly to job candidates, but when they do, this may happen in the form of an email or blind phone call based on a review of your online resume. When a recruiter contacts you to say “I think I have the perfect job for you”, your first thought may be, “How did you find my information?” If you’re curious, just ask. Then move on to the next step.

If you like the job, act.

If the job description you receive seems promising, call or email the recruiter back. Ask for more information and be willing to answer a few basic questions about yourself and your job search. Never give out information that should not be made public, like social security numbers or credit card information. No legitimate recruiter will ask for these things. (they’re paid by their employer clients, not by you.)

Don’t wait.

After this exchange of information, hang up and get back to your search. You may or may not hear from this recruiter again, since they may not maintain a dialogue if you aren’t a fit for the role. Remember two basic rules of an effective job search: be polite and stay in motion.

For more on how to work with recruiters and help them to help you, reach out to our professional recruiting team at Merritt Staffing.

Written and Verbal Communication for Job Seekers

November 11th, 2016

As you work to grab employer attention and win over potential recruiters and hiring managers, your knowledge base and specific job skills will play a strong role. You’ll have to have a demonstrate your ability to handle the sales tasks, clinical techniques, or technical aspects of your daily round. But your hiring managers will pay just as much attention to your communication skills. Can you send a message clearly? Can you provide and accept instructions? Can you win others over to your point of view? And most important of all: are you easy to get along with in a workplace setting? Can you use your words to earn the trust and respect of those around you? Here are a few ways to highlight your strengths as a speaker, listener, writer, reader, and team member.

Recognize that your documents represent you.

Your resume and cover letter don’t just highlight your education and background; they also give your reviewers an excellent example of your skills as a written communicator. If you think they’re only searching for facts and won’t look closely at your grammar, style, and wording, think again. Get all the editing help you need and make sure your application is flawless before you submit.

Your voice matters.

The first impression you make will come from your written application, but the second will probably come from your phone persona. When your employer calls to speak to you, keep your posture straight, speak clearly and smile as you talk (your listen can detect the expression on your face). Keep your voicemail message simple and professional.

Your emails also matter.

During the early stages of the selection process, you may exchange a few emails with your employers to confirm their acceptance of your resume, answer some screening questions, and set up an interview time and date. As you answer, think carefully about every line. Recognize that your tone and your attention to detail can actually make or break your chances at this early stage. Start your relationship off on sound footing.

Polish your interview skills.

Before the date of your scheduled interview, don’t just mark the meeting on your calendar and forget about it. You may see yourself as an experienced interviewee and you might expect your experience, education and skills to win the day for you. But a little practice never hurt anyone, a few sessions with a friend can help you relax and take tough questions in stride when your big day finally arrives. Practice pausing for two full seconds before you answer a question, and practice maintaining relaxed eye contact and a friendly, assertive posture.

For more on how to speak well, write well, and use your communication skills to lard your target job, reach out to the Connecticut staffing team at Merritt.

© Year Merritt Staffing. Site Credits.